Getting the Chimp Off Your Back

February 26, 2013  •  1 Comment

Click...Check the LCD.  Click...Check the LCD.  Click...You get the idea.  You may not realize it, but you do it.  So do I.  At some point or another, we all find ourselves relying a little too much on the comfortable warm glow of that three-inch square on the back of our cameras.  I wrote a guest post for Digital Photography School a few months ago about "chimping" and how to get past it-- or at least manage it.  In the article, I offered a couple of possible reasons why the practice is so wide-spread and outlined one option aimed at helping photographers "get the chimp off their back."  A favorite exercise of mine is covering my LCD with gaffer's tape and spending a few days "shooting like it's film."  Done right, this is a great way to reenforce what you know about exposure and boost your confidence shooting in Manual mode.

The article was met with very mixed comments and reviews.  Some felt I was way off base in my assessment that too much chimping stems from a lack of confidence.  Others were of the opinion that the LCD is a valuable tool and should be used to its fullest potential.  Some readers thought my suggested exercise was a stroke of genius, while others thought it was a bit simplistic and not at all necessary.  Personally, I still think that anything that can help boost your confidence and make you a better photographer is time well-spent.  What do you think?  Check out the full article here.


Comments

Bob Mielke(non-registered)
Part of the flack I used to get in photographic forums is from "purists". They are the photographers who insist on checking their histograms on the LCD screen. The main reason I sold all my Nikon gear was I yearned to get back to an earlier time in photography when cameras were simpler. My new Fuji X-E1 is just my kind of camera, with retro controls, light weight and high quality fast glass. The only time I've looked at my LCD before taking a shot is when I use the "Q" Quick Menu to set a timer shot. The shutter speed and aperture controls are where they should be, on the camera body and on the lens. I'm more concerned with expression and composure and not the effect of my control decisions. The exposure compensation control is also right where my right thumb hits. There's no need for menus.
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